League In The News


WZZM: Data: Kent County kids rank 26 out of 83 in well-being

According to the Kids Count in Michigan Data Book 2016, Kent County ranks 26 out of 83 Michigan counties in overall child well-being. The Data Book examines 16 indicators in various categories of health, education and economy. March 31, 2016 — WZZM

Macomb Daily: Child poverty up 74 percent in Macomb County

The Michigan League for Public Policy published last week its Kids Count in Michigan Data Book for 2016. When it came to the well-being of children, the numbers weren’t pretty.

“We think all kids count –- no matter where they live, their racial or ethnic background or their family income –- but do the elected officials charged with supporting their well-being share that priority?” said Alicia Guevara Warren, Kids Count in Michigan project director. “This book is not meant to be simply a reporting tool, but a catalyst for action.” March 28, 2016 — Macomb Daily

Grand Rapids Business Journal: More children slipped into poverty over the last decade

The book on how much children matter to the state of Michigan is now available and, unfortunately, you won’t like the last chapter. The Michigan League for Public Policy recently released its 25th annual Kids Count in Michigan Data Book for 2016. The report, which offers 16 indicators of child well-being throughout the state, reveals that childhood poverty has risen in 80 of 83 Michigan counties since 2006. The sad state of affairs especially has impacted minority children, according to the report.

“The Michigan League for Public Policy has been producing the Kids Count report for 25 years, but low-income kids are still struggling, and the repercussions touch every part of their lives,” said Gilda Jacobs, president and CEO of the Michigan League for Public Policy. March 25, 2016 — Grand Rapids Business Journal

Bridge Magazine: Guest column: Do kids really count in Michigan? Data shows them losing ground

Over the past year our state has received a significant amount of national and international attention, due to the Flint water crisis – exposing an entire city to poisonous lead – and the deplorable and dangerous conditions of the Detroit Public Schools. These two incidents alone raise the question of whether kids really do count in Michigan. State leaders have become extremely focused on the bottom line and reducing spending so much that basic needs like clean air, safe drinking water and quality schools have become issues. March 25, 2016 — Bridge Magazine

The Mining Journal: Child poverty rising

Child poverty in the Upper Peninsula increased 17 percent since 2006 to more than one in five kids, according to the Kids Count in Michigan Data Book 2016, released this week by the Michigan League for Public Policy. March 25, 2016 — The Mining Journal

Jackson Citizen Patriot: Poverty, child abuse high in Jackson County, ranked 60th for well-being of children

Numbers of children living in poverty and confirmed victims of child abuse or neglect have increased in Jackson County and remain above state rates, a recent study shows. Jackson County, however, has shown some improvement, rising from 69th last year to 60th this year in a ranking of the state’s 83 counties based on the well-being of their children, according to the Michigan League for Public Policy. March 24, 2016 — Jackson Citizen Patriot

Huron Daily Tribune: County ranks high for child well-being; but abuse rates rise

Huron County ranks among the 10 best counties in the state and top in the Thumb area for child wellbeing, according to a Kids Count in Michigan report by the Michigan League for Public Policy. While it’s an improvement, the report, intended to influence state policymakers, says child poverty has risen in 80 of 83 Michigan counties since 2006. Nearly 21 percent of Huron’s total children population 17 and under, or 1,286, live in poverty, according to the report. That’s a lower percentage than in Tuscola and Sanilac counties, but higher than in Lapeer and St. Clair counties. March 22, 2016 — Huron Daily Tribune

Port Huron Times Herald: Report: Child poverty and abuse rise

The number of children living in poverty increased in St. Clair and Sanilac counties between 2006 and 2014, according to the Michigan League for Public Policy. In St. Clair County, 19.7 percent of children were living in poverty in 2014, a 23 percent increase from 2006. Within the county, the rate of child abuse and neglect was 14.7 per 1,000 kids, according to the Kids County in Michigan Data Book 2016. March 22, 2016 — Port Huron Times Herald

WKZO: Child poverty increases

Jay & Jim talk with Alicia Guevara Warren, Kids Count in Michigan Project Director March 22, 2016 — WKZO

Lansing State Journal: Child poverty rates rose in Lansing area, group says

The number of children living in poverty in the Lansing area continues to rise along with most of the rest of the state, according to the Michigan League for Public Policy. Nearly 24 percent of Ingham County children were living in poverty in 2014, up from 21.5 percent in 2006, according the 2016 Kids Count report released Monday by the nonpartisan institute based in Lansing. March 22, 2016 — Lansing State Journal

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